Wisconsin

Devil's Lake, Wisconsin (WI)

Devil's Lake was originally a gorge of the Wisconsin River prior to the last ice age. At what is now the southern end of the lake, the river turned from a southerly direction to an easterly flow. During the ice age, a lobe of the glacier passed to the east of the Baraboo Hills and came up the river valley. It deposited materials and then melted, leaving a terminal moraine blocking the river, forming an earthen dam. Another moraine was deposited at the north end of the lake. The river eventually found a new course to the east of the Baraboo Hills, where the glacier had been, leaving a portion of the river gorge between the moraines filled with water. This body of water is Devil's Lake.  Devils Lake Rock Climbing is composed of six areas of climbing options.

Location

Devil's Lake, Wisconsin
United States
43° 24' 37.08" N, 89° 42' 54" W
US

Governor Dodge, Wisconsin (WI)

More than 8,000 years ago, men and women made winter camps at the base of rock overhangs enjoying the protection of the sandstone walls. As the weather warmed, they moved into more open areas of what is now Wisconsin and Illinois to hunt bison and other game. Now men and women still camp in Governor Dodge State Park and those sandstone walls have become the home to a new adventure. Rock Climbing and bouldering are becoming a more popular sport as people begin to more whole heartedly embrace the outdoors of the United States. Please respect the rock at Governor Dodge State Park, as some of it is fragile. It is requested that no more bolts be places in to the sandstone.

Location

Governor Dodge, Wisconsin
United States
43° 0' 51.84" N, 90° 6' 36.36" W
US

Grandad Bluff, Wisconsin (WI)

The bluffs along this portion of the Mississippi River are Prairie du Chien dolostone capping Cambrian sandstone. Grandad Bluff is a classic mesa, as are all the bluffs along the river. In 1928 there was a movement to change the name to Granddad Mountain, and to change all the Bluffs along the Mississippi to The Mississippi Mountain Range. Bliss Road provides access to the bluff. The road was closed due to the floods of August 2007. However, after major repairs, Bliss Road was reopened to traffic on November 20, 2008. Trucks and buses are still prohibited from using Bliss Road, because of weight limits but the rock climbing is superior.

Location

Grandad Bluff, Wisconsin
United States
43° 48' 45" N, 91° 12' 21.6" W
US

Interstate Park, Wisconsin (WI)

Interstate Park comprises two adjacent state parks on the Minnesota-Wisconsin border, both named Interstate State Park. They straddle the St. Croix River, a deep basalt gorge with glacial potholes and other rock formations. At the end of the last glacial period 10,000 years ago, torrents of water flowed south from the melting glaciers, carving the St. Croix River Valley. The soft Cambrian sediments were easily eroded into a wide valley, but the hard basalt was resistant to erosion and when it reached the hard basalt floor, the river was channeled into a deep, steep-walled gorge, which makes for some fabulous climbing opportunities.

Location

Interstate Park, Wisconsin
United States
45° 23' 20.76" N, 92° 39' 26.64" W
US

Necedah Petenwell Rock, Wisconsin (WI)

The name "Necedah" comes from the Ho Chunk peoples who inhabited the area before the arrival of European settlers and means "Land of the Yellow Waters", a reference to the Yellow River. Necedah, Wisconsin is situated at the base of a high cliff on the Yellow River, a few miles from its mouth, and is opposite the famous Petenwell Rock. Petenwell Rock is a highly acclaimed climbing location in Wisconsin with beautiful sandstone cliffs and boulders that ripple across the hillsides of this little logging town.

Location

Necedah Petenwell Rock, Wisconsin
United States
43° 58' 15.96" N, 89° 59' 49.56" W
US

Willow River State Park, Wisconsin (WI)

Settlers moved in to Willow River State Park, and by 1830 logging and wheat farming were common in the Willow River Valley. The river was invaluable for the former, as logs were floated downstream to the St. Croix. A German immigrant, Christian Burkhardt, realized the river could also be harnessed for the latter industry, and built a grist mill here in 1868. Burkhardt became a wealthy landowner and followed developments in water-powered industry. Burkhardt eventually built four power plants and dams on the river, which provided electricity to Hudson. Northern States Power purchased Burkhardt's power company in 1945 and operated its sites until 1963, when damage to one of the plants from a lightning strike prompted the company to liquidate their Willow River holdings. In 1967 Northern States Power sold the land to the Wisconsin Conservation Commission for a state park, and stabilized the dams at a financial loss. The state park opened in 1971. Some of the dams were removed in the 1990s to improve the scenery and trout fishery, and now only one remains. What also remains is some amazing rock climbing opportunities.

Location

Willow River State Park, Wisconsin
United States
45° 0' 45" N, 92° 40' 59.88" W
US